Rarroloroorf

Some people don’t like to listen. Some will try to listen but they are hard of hearing. Some people will listen but won’t care about what you’re saying. And some of them will think that you’re too insignificant to listen to. When I talk, I hope that the other person is listening to what I’m saying. When they talking, I pay attention so I hope they’re doing the same.

I was working away at the computer when I heard a knock at the door. There’s a door by my desk that leads out of the office. This is an emergency door but the guys from security like to use it to check up on me. They’re too lazy to use the front door so they use this one. First I heard something that sounded like keys scratching against the door and then I hear it open.

The security guy popped his head into the office and waited for me. I slid across the floor in my chair and looked around the desk to tell him that everything is fine. He nodded and proceeded to close the door. Before he did that shouted at him to wait. I put my hand in the air and extended my index finger. You know the gesture when you want to say “#1” that’s what I did. Only in this case, that gesture is the universal sign language for “wait.” Unfortunately, this security guy never got that memo.

I wanted to ask him a question regarding the new photo ID memo that was going around. Security requires the staff in this building to have a new photo ID card. But since I was working nights, I had no idea when I can go in to have my picture taken. I wanted to ask this security guy but he didn’t know the universal signal to wait. Instead, he looked at me and said something and then left. I didn’t quite hear what he said but it sounded like, “Rarroloroorf.”

I was a little baffled. I was thinking, what language was he speaking in. It sounded like he was literally speaking in tongue. He wanted to say something but it came out wrong. The words were probably at the tip of his tongue but somehow he couldn’t say it right. “Rarroloroorf” could have been his way of saying, “Blah blah blah.” I was still stuck on trying to figure out what “Rarroloroorf” meant, that by the time I came to, he was already gone.

Whatever he said when he was at the door could not have been English. It didn’t sound anything remotely close to English. For all I know, he could have said something in Swaheli, “Jambo habari!” Or maybe he was trying to say something using internet lingo like “LOL.” Maybe my gesture for him to wait looked funny and he wanted to say, “ROFLOL!” That’s the closest thing that I can think of at the moment so I’m going to go with that. I didn’t feel like going after him and stopping him. I just sat there in my chair, dumbfounded.

I think people can just make up their own words and use it. If it’s not in the dictionary, that doesn’t mean it’s not a word. Google wasn’t in the dictionary but now it is. You can probably make up a word and if you use it enough, other people will use it to. Next thing you know, it’ll be in the Oxford dictionary.